Wisdom on Wednesdays—Poets, pagans, and magicians

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Nativity, oil on canvas, 30 x 36 in.

“Those who believe in magic, the poets and the pagans, should be tenderly handled by the theologian.  The magician, as with the shepherd, is the first worshiper of Christ, and Christ without magic is unthinkable: the burning bush, the speaking stones, the possessed pigs, the fermented water, and so on, culminating in the bread which is the flesh of God and the bleeding grape from the vine of the murdered Christ.”   —from the essay “Miracles”  (1943)

New book, Silvermine, now available at 40% off

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The new book Silvermine by CSF director Samuel Schmitt is now available at 40% off today only —Monday December 12, 2016.  Order yours now in time for Christmas.

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Carl Schmitt’s wife Gertrude and his brother Robert enjoy the view from the back of Robert’s house in Silvermine in this photograph from the 1920s. The images shows just how open Silvermine – now covered almost entirely with dense woods – was at that time. One resident has written, “From the church spires of New Canaan to the west one could see all the way to the silver ribbon of the Sound and the misty outline of Long Island to the south.” (photograph from the Carl Schmitt Foundation archives on page 16 of Silvermine.)

Through dozens of vintage photographs the new book tells the fascinating history of Silvermine—the hamlet Carl Schmitt called home for 70 years—and its rich social, artistic, and cultural life during the heyday of the artists’ colony in the first half of the last century.

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Order from Arcadia Publishing today only—December 12, 2016—to purchase your copy at this special discount. And don’t forget that your purchase supports the Carl Schmitt Foundation.

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Wisdom on Wednesdays—The desire of the wildest imagination

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Annunciation, 1921, oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in.

“Today we are prone to forget that Christ combines the Aesthetic, the Expedient, and the Religious Life.  We forget that He came not only because man needed hope for eternal beatitude but that he was also the historic concrete answer to the desire of the wildest imagination: the appearance on earth of a God-man.  History united to myth.”  (1960)