Listen to “The Catholic Vision of Carl Schmitt” on SoundCloud

If you missed my talk on Carl Schmitt last month in New York, the audio is now available below and at SoundCloud.  It’s part of “Art of the the Beautiful” lecture series hosted by the Catholic Artists Society.

The talk explores Schmitt’s vision connecting the Catholic tradition to the seven fine arts and to the life of the artist himself.  As a young man, Schmitt saw what he had to do to realize this vision: a struggle for what he called the mystical virtues of purity, poverty, and humility, corresponding to the lyric, epic, and dramatic stages of his artistic development.  The fruit of this journey was a clear vision of things seen in the masterworks of his maturity.

You can follow the close discussion of some of Schmitt finest works by downloading the images here.

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Wisdom on Wednesdays—Permanent, temporal, eternal

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Anno Domini 1941, 1941, oil on panel, 23½” x 18″. Inscribed “Carl Schmitt Ao Dn 1941″ lower left
This work was featured in the Summer 2012 issue of the CSF News.

“The past is permanent, a myth and therefore aesthetic—and real. A beginning.
“The present is temporal, scientific, expedient, and therefore real. A means.
“The future is eternal, a revelation and therefore spiritual—and Real. An end.”
(1960)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—“Is there anything more real than poverty with a family?”

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Shack where Schmitt stayed on his property in Silvermine before his marriage.
Pastel on paper, 14 x 11 in.

“Critics comfortably off and cosmopolite tell me that it is fatal for me to live alone in the woods and paint, that I must not separate myself from humanity, reality. . . . Humanity?  Is there anything more human than ones own children?  Reality?  Is there anything more real than poverty with a family? (except death, which is also tasted each day)?”  (1931)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—When one thinks as a Christian

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Loaf of Bread, 1947, oil on hardboard, 12 x 14 in.

“We are so much in the habit of dichotomous thought that it would shock us to hear ‘Christ is a myth’ or ‘The Eucharist is a symbol.’  And yet these are two phrases are true.  What should be added is that final phrase ‘as well as a reality.’  For a thing can be both a symbol and a reality at the same time.  When one thinks as a Christian.”  (1958)