Wisdom on Wednesdays—The myth which is eternally true

Resurrection-245x300 - at Campion Hall Oxford

Resurrection, c. 1940, Campion Hall, Oxford University
This painting is very similar to one of the same name bought by Schmitt’s good friend John Cavanaugh in the 1940s and now owned by the C. Michael Schmitt family. Schmitt’s great-granddaughter Bridget Skidd wrote of her discovery of this painting here.

“The Church keeps alive from day to day the tradition, the myth, which is eternally true.  Without the memory of the fall from paradise and the Redemption, no apprehension of the Eternal happiness is possible to man.”  (1960)
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Wisdom on Wednesdays—The desire of the wildest imagination

CSF12302 - from slide

Annunciation, 1921, oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in.

“Today we forget that Christ came not only because man needed hope for eternal beatitude but that he was also the historic concrete answer to the desire of the wildest imagination: the appearance on earth of a God-man.  History united to myth.”  (1960)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—Permanent, temporal, eternal

Anno Domini - corrected

Anno Domini 1941, 1941, oil on panel, 23½” x 18″. Inscribed “Carl Schmitt Ao Dn 1941″ lower left
This work was featured in the Summer 2012 issue of the CSF News.

“The past is permanent, a myth and therefore aesthetic—and real. A beginning.
“The present is temporal, scientific, expedient, and therefore real. A means.
“The future is eternal, a revelation and therefore spiritual—and Real. An end.”
(1960)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The desire of the wildest imagination

CSF12302 - from slide

Annunciation, 1921, oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in.

“Today we forget that Christ came not only because man needed hope for eternal beatitude but that he was also the historic concrete answer to the desire of the wildest imagination: the appearance on earth of a God-man.  History united to myth.”  (1960)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The myth which is eternally true

Resurrection-245x300 - at Campion Hall Oxford

Resurrection, c. 1940, Campion Hall, Oxford University
This painting is very similar to one of the same name bought by Schmitt’s good friend John Cavanaugh in the 1940s and now owned by the C. Michael Schmitt family.  Schmitt’s great-granddaughter Bridget Skidd wrote of her discovery of this painting here.

“The Church keeps alive from day to day the tradition, the myth, which is eternally true.  Without the memory of the fall from paradise and the Redemption, no apprehension of the Eternal happiness is possible to man.”  (1960)