Talk on the new book Silvermine tonight in Ridgefield, CT

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CSF director Samuel Schmitt will present an Author Talk on his new book Silvermine tonight, April 26, 2017, at 7 pm.  Sponsored by the independent bookstore Books on the Common, the event will take place in the Main Program Room at the Ridgefield Public Library, 472 Main Street in Ridgefield, Connecticut.

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Through dozens of historic photographs Silvermine tells the story of the bucolic hamlet Carl Schmitt called home for over 70 years.  The book recounts how the picturesque valley, once buzzing with sawmills, was transformed into a cultural hub with the coming of the artists, including Carl Schmitt, who formed the Silvermine Guild in 1922.  It’s part of the well-known “Images of America” series from Arcadia Publishing.  See a preview and order here from Amazon.com.  Your purchase benefits the Carl Schmitt Foundation.

For more information and to register for this event, click here.

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Wisdom on Wednesdays—The myth which is eternally true

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Resurrection, c. 1940, Campion Hall, Oxford University
This painting is very similar to one of the same name bought by Schmitt’s good friend John Cavanaugh in the 1940s and now owned by the C. Michael Schmitt family.  Schmitt’s great-granddaughter Bridget Skidd wrote of her discovery of this painting here.

“The Church keeps alive from day to day the tradition, the myth, which is eternally true.  Without the memory of the fall from paradise and the Redemption, no apprehension of the Eternal happiness is possible to man.”  (1960)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—“It is easy to love humanity”

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Gertrude feeding her son Austin, September 9, 1921

“I always suspect the poet or artist who loves humanity. It is immature and an oversimplification of a difficulty. For it is easy to love humanity—the trouble comes when we attempt to love our neighbor. Our neighbor is not a vague abstraction but the individual with whom we come in contact in our daily lives.”  (c. 1931)