Wisdom on Wednesdays—The myth which is eternally true

Resurrection-245x300 - at Campion Hall Oxford

Resurrection, c. 1940, Campion Hall, Oxford University
This painting is very similar to one of the same name bought by Schmitt’s good friend John Cavanaugh in the 1940s and now owned by the C. Michael Schmitt family.  Schmitt’s great-granddaughter Bridget Skidd wrote of her discovery of this painting here.

“The Church keeps alive from day to day the tradition, the myth, which is eternally true.  Without the memory of the fall from paradise and the Redemption, no apprehension of the Eternal happiness is possible to man.”  (1960)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—When one thinks as a Christian

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Loaf of Bread, 1947, oil on hardboard, 12 x 14 in.

“We are so much in the habit of dichotomous thought that it would shock us to hear ‘Christ is a myth’ or ‘The Eucharist is a symbol.’  And yet these are two phrases are true.  What should be added is that final phrase ‘as well as a reality.’  For a thing can be both a symbol and a reality at the same time.  When one thinks as a Christian.”  (1958)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The Hope

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Noli me tangere (Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene after the Resurrection), woodblock print, 1920, 8¾ x 5 in.

“Christianity in the first 500 years of its existence was known as ‘The Love’ in much the same way as it is known in our day as ‘The Faith.’  It died as love and resurrected as faith as it is dying today as faith and is resurrected as a hope.”  (1941)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The Christian crux II

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Via Crucis, c. 1936, oil on aluminum, 18 x 15 in.

“I say it again—this Christian crux—this cross of Christ, when carried, will bring an epic poetic impulse (and consequently a heroic era for all art) that will make Greek art seem trivial, as Greek art is the heroism of the stoic and not of the humble cross-bearer.”  (c. 1930)