Wisdom on Wednesdays—A living death

Guardian Angel, c. 1929, oil on canvas, 30 x 36 in.
A contemporary black-and-white photograph.

“God ultimately forces men to make a choice: predestining them to free will!
“That coercion is death.
“Since man will only use his will in death it follows that special destiny grants a living death to the elect (to the saints).”  (1932)

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Wisdom on Wednesdays—Alone and a fool

St. Francis, etching, January 1926

“Christ was something more than an English gentleman.  The best people voted for his death.  He died alone and a fool.  No English gentleman fears death if it is done by the best people and gregariously.  What he really fears is making a fool of himself like St. Francis, and doing it alone.”  (1931)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The mark of God’s love

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Gertrude, pastel on paper, c. 1918, 20 x 15 in.

“Man is only happy in cooperating with his individual destiny.  All men are destined to perfect virtue.
Some men are destined to achieve virtue before death.
Some are destined to achieve it after death.
It is a special mark of providence to have the opportunity of complete humility before death.  The longer before death it is—the greater the mark of God’s love.”

(October 19, 1929)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—“Is there anything more real than poverty with a family?”

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Shack where Schmitt stayed on his property in Silvermine before his marriage.
Pastel on paper, 14 x 11 in.

“Critics comfortably off and cosmopolite tell me that it is fatal for me to live alone in the woods and paint, that I must not separate myself from humanity, reality. . . . Humanity?  Is there anything more human than ones own children?  Reality?  Is there anything more real than poverty with a family? (except death, which is also tasted each day)?”  (1931)