Wisdom on Wednesdays—Alone and a fool

St. Francis, etching, January 1926

“Christ was something more than an English gentleman.  The best people voted for his death.  He died alone and a fool.  No English gentleman fears death if it is done by the best people and gregariously.  What he really fears is making a fool of himself like St. Francis, and doing it alone.”  (1931)

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Wisdom on Wednesdays—The only power in the world

CSF41026 - CROPPED

Noli me tangere (Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene after the Resurrection), 1920, woodblock print, 8¾ x 5 in.

“The only power in the world—the basic creative force—is Charity: the transcendent existence of the Father made immanent and available to man through Christ, in his birth as man, and perpetuated by the Holy Spirit.”  (1964)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The myth which is eternally true

Resurrection-245x300 - at Campion Hall Oxford

Resurrection, c. 1940, Campion Hall, Oxford University
This painting is very similar to one of the same name bought by Schmitt’s good friend John Cavanaugh in the 1940s and now owned by the C. Michael Schmitt family.  Schmitt’s great-granddaughter Bridget Skidd wrote of her discovery of this painting here.

“The Church keeps alive from day to day the tradition, the myth, which is eternally true.  Without the memory of the fall from paradise and the Redemption, no apprehension of the Eternal happiness is possible to man.”  (1960)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The desire of the wildest imagination

CSF12302 - from slide

Annunciation, 1921, oil on canvas, 20 x 24 in.

“Today we are prone to forget that Christ combines the Aesthetic, the Expedient, and the Religious Life.  We forget that He came not only because man needed hope for eternal beatitude but that he was also the historic concrete answer to the desire of the wildest imagination: the appearance on earth of a God-man.  History united to myth.”  (1960)