Wisdom on Wednesdays—Duty toward society, responsibility to God

Peter, pastel on paper, c. 1930

“The contemporary dichotomy: The individual vs. the person
“The individual: highest duty toward society
“The Person: highest responsibility to God.”
(1961)

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Wisdom on Wednesdays—Vox populi, vox Dei

CSF13206

Untitled, oil on canvas, c. 1923.
The figures in the painting are modeled after the artist’s wife Gertrude and son Robert. The maple trees are at the Lordale estate, home of Gertrude’s parents in Silvermine.

“That the ‘voice of the people is the voice of God’ I believe to be true. The belief is fallacious only when ‘the people’ are thought of as only those who are living.  The living, comparatively a small minority, are generally heard too much for the good of society.”  (1928)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—Vox populi, vox Dei

CSF13206

Untitled, oil on canvas, c. 1923.
The figures in the painting are modeled after the artist’s wife Gertrude and son Robert. The maple trees are at the Lordale estate, home of Gertrude’s parents in Silvermine.

“That the ‘voice of the people is the voice of God’ I believe to be true.  The belief is fallacious only when ‘the people’ are thought of as only those who are living.  The living, comparatively a small minority, are generally heard too much for the good of society.”  (1928)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—Sanctified, redeemed, reborn

Christ at Emmaus - etching - CROPPED

Christ at Emmaus, dry point etching

“One can only be sanctified as an individual in a society of individuals of which Christ is the head.  One can only be redeemed as a person in a society of persons of which Christ is the head.  One can only be reborn in a society of families of which Christ is the head.”  (1958)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The only sin is treason

“Today in America the old Christian idea of sin is fast disappearing.  There remains (and is encouraged) a vast sense of social guilt.  The only sin is treason to society (the state).”  (1961)

Second Night border

The Second Night, 1929, oil on canvas, 48 x 40 in.
From a contemporary black and white photograph; present location unknown.

For Carl Schmitt’s own “explanation” of this painting, see the article “The Artist Explains His Work,” from February 2015 issue of the CSF e-newsletter Vision.