Wisdom on Wednesdays—The Hope

CSF41026 - CROPPED

Noli me tangere (Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene after the Resurrection), woodblock print, 1920, 8¾ x 5 in.

“Christianity in the first 500 years of its existence was known as ‘The Love’ in much the same way as it is known in our day as ‘The Faith.’  It died as love and resurrected as faith as it is dying today as faith and is resurrected as a hope.”  (1941)

Advertisements

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The art of shepherds and kings

CSF41013

Nativity, woodblock print, c. 1920.

“Christian art is primarily the art of the peasant and the prince—unselfconsciously in a stable; shepherds and kings once made simple loving gifts and regal wise sacrifices.” (1932)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—As near despair and madness as possible

CSF12305

St. Paul the Hermit, oil on canvas, c. 1922, 30 x 25 in. (Private collection)
Schmitt’s depiction of St. Paul of Thebes (d. c. 341) being fed miraculously by a raven was probably inspired by a painting of the saint by the great seventeenth-century Spanish artist Velázquez. The enigmatic figure on the foreground is Schmitt’s own contribution.
A version of this painting in brighter colors is part of the Carl Schmitt Foundation’s collection.

“To come as near despair as possible without losing hope—that is the aim of a Christian.
“To come as near madness as possible without losing sanity—(that is, to be as fanatical as possible without losing idiocy) is the aim of an artist.”  (1932)

Wisdom on Wednesdays—The Love, the Faith, the Hope

CSF41027 - Easter Greetings

Easter card by Robert Schmitt, 1921.

“Christianity in the first 500 years of its existence was known as ‘The Love’ in much the same way as it is known in our day as ‘The Faith.’  It died as love and resurrected as faith as it is dying today as faith and is resurrected as a hope.”  (1941)